Latest News and Updates

Tue - June 16, 2020 8:50 am     A+ | a-
Maurice Lynch Music: Joins Harlem Standard to support The Jazz Foundation of America Covid-19 Relief
Maurice Lynch Music: Joins Harlem Standard to support The Jazz Foundation of America Covid-19 Relief
Maurice Lynch Music is glad to announce its new partnership with Harlem Standard. We are looking forward to this national endorsement for our music and vision. With both companies sharing an equal love for all things Harlem. Maurice Lynch Music is excited to connect our brand with Harlem Standard.
 
With so many tastemakers heading to Harlem and building on its rich cultural legacy. Harlem Standard is inspired by the rebellious nature of prohibition, jazz, and the Harlem Renaissance. They have revived old techniques to distill and blend spirits for the modern palate and connoisseur. Their uncompromising spirits are crafted to be smooth and refined. This great product is like a great jazz song when it’s ready everyone will hear about it.
 
Maurice Lynch stated “I am so happy to begin working with Harlem Standard and future campaigns. Our music will be featured in upcoming commercials and promos. Our first endeavor is to support The Jazz Foundation of America. I wanted to give back and help so many of my fellow musicians and singers who have been affected by Covid-19. Maurice Lynch Music will be available on Harlem Standards playlist and a portion of the proceeds will support this effort. With our sponsorship from Harlem Standard we are planning future promotional and musical events in Harlem and across America”.
 
Harlem Standard is available to ship to your home! Harlem Standard will be donating proceeds from every purchase of whiskey to the @JazzFoundationofAmerica Covid-19 Relief Fund for musicians. Please visit@HarlemStandard across all social media outlets and their playlist to purchase music, and links below to purchase this product and to celebrate jazz.  

Stay Safe,
 
Maurice Lynch
Producer
 
#HarlemStandard
#jazzfoundationofamerica
#MauriceLynchMusic
#TonightJosephine
#Covid-19ReliefFund
#HarlemJazz
#MauriceLynch&TheHarlemMusicalRevue
 

https://harlemstandard.com/
https://jazzfoundation.org/
http://mauricelynchmusic.com/
https://www.ackerwines.com/WebStore/Results/harlem
Fri - June 5, 2020 2:44 am     A+ | a-
June Is Black Music Appreciation Month- Black Lives And Black Music Matters
June Is Black Music Appreciation Month- Black Lives And Black Music Matters
The Contributions of African Americans to music is unprecedented. African American music has been the heartbeat of America and emulated around the world. Our musical styles are copied world-wide and even here in America by Whites. Yet we are still the most hated people here in our own country. Every genre of music in America has been influenced by Black African slave decedents. Black Americans have suffered long enough. We have endured Slavery, the Black Codes, Jim Crow. Every ethnic race that comes to America, and enjoy their benefits off the backs of Black Americans.   Let’s use this month to reflect and celebrate African Americans in Music…."Our Music is Our Voice”......"Black Lives and Black Music Matters" 
 
Maurice Lynch
Maurice Lynch Music
 
When 12-year-old singer Keedron Bryant lifted his voice to poignantly decry the senseless murder of George Floyd in a May 29 Instagram post that’s since drawn nearly 3 million views, the pre-teen joined the countless voices that have been fighting to end racism for the last 400 years. Music has always played an integral role in black people’s fight for equality and justice. So as that hard-fought struggle boils over onto city streets across the country, this year’s celebration of Black Music Month arrives at a crucial turning point.
 
When black people were uprooted from Africa to become slaves in 1600s America, one of the things they brought with them was call-and-response music. It not only helped while away hours of back-breaking field work but also doubled as a coded means to send news and other information across the slave network. Out of that came the spirituals that strengthened slaves' unyielding faith, hope and perseverance. The lyrics of two such spirituals, "Steal Away" and "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," have been viewed by some as references to the Underground Railroad, which helped slaves escape to the North and Canada.
Since then, the long march toward equality has been fueled by other musical touchstones. Early civil rights activist and songwriter James Weldon Johnson penned the liberation poem "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing" in 1900. Set to music by Johnson's brother a few years later, the song -- included on Beyoncé's 2018 Coachella set list -- is now popularly known as the black national anthem. Jewish civil rights activist and teacher Abel Meeropol protested racism through his composition "Strange Fruit," using the South’s lynching of black men as a metaphor for fruit hanging from trees. Billie Holiday’s stark yet visceral interpretation of the song, which she recorded in 1939, still resonates.
 
Sam Cooke ("A Change Is Gonna Come") and Nina Simone ("Mississippi Goddam") helped sound the rallying cry (along with the spiritual "We Shall Overcome") as the civil rights movement pushed beyond the '50s into the mid-60s. Then James Brown picked up the baton with the August 1968 anthem "Say It Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud" -- four months after calming Boston fans with a live televised concert the night after Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4.
More voices joined the chorus in the '70s, including Curtis Mayfield (“We the People Who Are Darker Than Blue”), Marvin Gaye (“What’s Going On”), Gil Scott-Heron (“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”) and Simone again ("To Be Young, Gifted and Black"). In tandem with the 1972 Watts Summer Festival, Stax Records organized the benefit concert Wattstax to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the '65 riots in L.A.’s Watts community. Featured performers included the Staple SingersIsaac Hayes and Otis Redding's backing band the Bar-Kays.
 
Rap took root in the '80s with groups like Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five (“The Message”), Public Enemy (“Fight the Power”) and N.W.A (“Fuck Tha Police”) handing down no-holds-barred stories about life straight from the streets -- putting a contemporary spin on the oral history tradition of African griots. Fast forward to 2015 and Kendrick Lamar’s uplifting yet defiant “Alright” was adopted as the anthem for #BlackLivesMatter in the wake of the deaths of Tamir RiceMichael Brown and others.
This month (June 17) marks eight years since the passing of Rodney King, who was brutally beaten by LAPD officers in 1991. Their subsequent acquittal sparked L.A.'s riots in 1992, a year that saw the release of the controversial protest song "Cop Killer" by Ice-T's heavy metal band Body Count and hip-hop group Da Lench Mob’s “Freedom Got an A.K.” And now here we are as history repeats itself yet again with the deaths this year of Floyd, Breonna TaylorAhmaud Arbery and many others. This time, however, a new march for civil rights is mobilizing.
 
As more voices across the country lift to join the young Bryant's, it’s imperative that protests and initiatives to end systemic racism go beyond fashionable lip service. As a black woman and mother of a 26-year-old daughter and 24-year-old son, I stand in solidarity with others to nurture meaningful exchange and change moving forward. As a music fan and industry journalist for the last 20-something years, I’ve witnessed firsthand music’s power as a universal language to uplift, educate, empower and bring people together for a common cause. During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Swizz Beatz and Timbaland’s Verzuz series on Instagram is just one example of how artists are using social media to engage and stay connected with fans.
 
So while we celebrate the rich legacy of black music's past, present and future, it is also time for the industry to help double down on actions to ensure that inclusion and diversity, racial tolerance and cultural appreciation (rather than appropriation) can truly become the new normal. Four hundred years is enough time to wait.

Contributing Links:

https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/features/9395584/black-music-month-history-turning-point-gail-mitchell?fbclid=IwAR3r2RjzrqBMVuzgqRKE6yw9zQE1jNQuQskBkqeDPjTmjHNKeXivfhR4GxE
https://www.google.com/amp/s/blog.pandora.com/us/30-times-black-music-changed-the-world/amp/
https://www.nypl.org/blog/2014/10/21/song-dance-power-black-music
https://blog.usejournal.com/roots-the-impact-of-black-music-on-america-and-the-world-ed00824f7f13
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.newsweek.com/black-music-month-2017-events-facts-barack-obama-618510%3famp=1
https://theculturetrip.com/north-america/articles/12-black-musicians-who-changed-music-forever/?amp=1

http://mauricelynchmusic.com/
#BlackMusicAppreciationMusic
#MauriceLynchMusic
#MauriceLynch 
#EndPoliceBrutality 
#BlackLivesMatter
#BlackMusicMatters



 
Wed - June 3, 2020 11:16 pm     A+ | a-
Carnegie Hall Juneteenth Celebration Host Rev. Dr. James A. Forbes Jr..... photo  by Chris Lee
Carnegie Hall Juneteenth Celebration Host Rev. Dr. James A. Forbes Jr..... photo by Chris Lee
Join Rev. Dr. James A. Forbes Jr., Senior Pastor, Emeritus of The Riverside Church in Manhattan as he host and leads this great celebration.

Dating back to the end of the American Civil War in 1865, Juneteenth commemorates our nation’s true independence—the day when all members of the newly reunited nation were finally declared free. More than 400 years after the first enslaved African people were brought to the North American colonies, the fight for equality continues. Through music and commentary—including performances by pianist Joseph Joubert and the Juneteenth Mass Choir, speeches by Bill Moyers and Bishop Michael Curry, and comments from Carnegie Hall’s Chairman Robert F. Smith and Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Wynton Marsalis—Rev. Dr. James A. Forbes Jr. leads this celebration, recognizing the importance of this historic day and acknowledging the long road still ahead.

Free Event: Online 

https://www.carnegiehall.org/Calendar/2020/06/19/Live-with-Carnegie-Hall-Juneteenth-Celebration-0730PM?fbclid=IwAR1r9lSjh3X264RyhqsC53NARi-2A3CPJ0tYGsW1_AHl0SmuaRjqrhCOnOk


Mon - June 1, 2020 7:40 am     A+ | a-
Maurice Lynch Music- All Lives Can't Matter Until Black Lives Matter.
Maurice Lynch Music- All Lives Can't Matter Until Black Lives Matter.
When Black people get free, everybody gets free. ” #BlackLivesMatter doesn’t mean your life isn’t important–it means that Black lives, which are seen as without value within White supremacy. Given the disproportionate impact violence has on Black lives, I understand that when Black people in this country get free, the benefits will be wide reaching and transformative for society as a whole. I stand against discrimination and social injustice 
 
Maurice Lynch
Maurice Lynch Music 

http://mauricelynchmusic.com/
#BlackMusicAppreciationMusic
#MauriceLynchMusic
#MauriceLynch 
#EndPoliceBrutality 
#BlackLivesMatter
#BlackMusicMatters
 
Sat - May 30, 2020 6:19 pm     A+ | a-
March on Washington Demonstrators, 1963 (Photo by Library of Congress/Interim Archives/Getty Images)
March on Washington Demonstrators, 1963 (Photo by Library of Congress/Interim Archives/Getty Images)
This Civil Rights Photograph features black and white people holding signs at the March on Washington, 1963. One sign reads: "We demand Voting Rights" and is held by a white woman. Another sign reads: "We demand an end to police brutality now" and is held by a black man. Today we are still marching for the same issues we are faced with today. ’ (Photo by Library of Congress/Interim Archives/Getty Images)
 
Demonstrators hold up signs as they participate in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Washington DC, August 28, 1963. Among the visible signs are ones that read ‘We Demand Voting Rights Now!’, ‘We Demand An End To Police Brutality Now!’, and ‘We March For Jobs.’ (Photo by Library of Congress/Interim Archives/Getty Images)
 
Today people of color continue to be disproportionately incarcerated, policed, and sentenced to death at significantly higher rates than their white counterparts. Further, racial disparities in the criminal-justice system threaten communities of color—disenfranchising thousands by limiting voting rights and denying equal access to employment,  health care, housing, public benefits, and education to millions more. In light of these disparities, it is imperative that criminal-justice reform evolves as the civil rights issue of the 21st century.
 
: "A riot is the language of the unheard”… Martin Luther King Jr.
                                   
This is INSANE……. This has to stop…… REGISTER TO VOTE!!! For GEORGE FLOYD

"RACISM IS A PANDEMIC"
 
Maurice Lynch
Maurice Lynch Music

http://mauricelynchmusic.com/
#BlackMusicAppreciationMusic
#MauriceLynchMusic
#MauriceLynch 
#EndPoliceBrutality 
#BlackLivesMatter
#BlackMusicMatters
#EndPoliceBrutality 
#BlackLivesMatter
Thu - April 30, 2020 2:17 pm     A+ | a-
Maurice Lynch Music- Join Christian McBride @ Apollo Cafe on National Jazz Day
Maurice Lynch Music- Join Christian McBride @ Apollo Cafe on National Jazz Day
Hi Music & Fashion World,

It's International Jazz Day join the Apollo Cafe this Thursday and celebrate with the Grammy-award Christian McBride! @ the Apollo Cafe Thursday at 2pm EST on Facebook for a live music set full of songs, stories and a few special guests. 
Stay Safe,

Maurice Lynch
Producer

https://www.instagram.com/p/B_i2ge0JQYT/
https://www.apollotheater.org/
http://mauricelynchmusic.com/
#JazzDay
#MauriceLynchMusic
#NationalJazzAppreciationMonth
Fri - April 24, 2020 4:18 pm     A+ | a-
Maurice Lynch Music: Valaida Snow,Lil Hardin Armstrong & Una Mae Carlisle. 3 Great Musicians in Jazz
Maurice Lynch Music: Valaida Snow,Lil Hardin Armstrong & Una Mae Carlisle. 3 Great Musicians in Jazz
Maurice Lynch Music - Celebrates National Jazz Appreciation Month and 10 Unsung Great African-American Womens in Jazz All April long, National Jazz Month celebrates the heritage and history of jazz.The roots of jazz can be found in the blues. The exciting history of jazz takes us through the deep south along back roads and into the big cities all across the United States and then the world. The thrum of the bass and sizzle of the snare make the nightclubs dazzle just a little more against the brass and lights.

Growing out of the deep south at the turn of the 20th century and working its way up the Mississipi Delta, jazz influenced musicians along the way. As it grew, it inspired more improvisation, and as a result, new methods formed and new styles of music, too. Music and jazz were developing and changing quickly. The impact of jazz on the country was profound.
Kick back and listen to the sound of history as you listen to Miles Davis or any modern-day jazz musician. Let the music move you.
We’re often taught to think of jazz’s history as a cavalcade of great men and their bands, but from its beginnings the music was often in the hands of women. Listen to some of the greatest.

10 Women in Jazz Who Never Got Their Due
Young, female instrumentalists have been establishing a firmer footing in jazz, taking some of the music’s boldest creative steps and organizing for change on a structural level. But this isn’t an entirely new development.
While we’re often taught to think of jazz’s history as a cavalcade of great men and their bands, from its beginnings in the early 20th century women played a range of important roles, including onstage. During World War II, right in the heart of the swing era, all-female bands became a sensation, filling the void left by men in the military. But in fact they were continuing a tradition that had begun in the vaudeville years and continued, albeit to a lesser degree, in jazz’s early decades.Prevented from taking center stage, many female instrumentalists became composers, arrangers or artists’ managers. Buffeted by sexism from venue owners and record companies in the United States, they often went abroad to pursue careers in Europe or even Asia. As was also true of their male counterparts, the African-American women who helped blaze some of jazz’s earliest trails had to innovate their way around additional roadblocks.

“These jazz women were pioneers, and huge proponents in disseminating jazz and making it a global art form,” said Hannah Grantham, a musicologist at the National Museum of African American History and Culture who studies the work of female jazz musicians and contributed notes to this list. “I don’t think they’ve been given enough credit for that, because of their willingness to go everywhere.” The piano and organ were considered more socially acceptable instruments for young women to play, and few serious fans of jazz would be unfamiliar with the names Mary Lou WilliamsMarian McPartlandHazel ScottShirley Scott or Alice Coltrane. But the ranks of female jazz genius run much deeper than that. Here are 10 performers who made a big impression in their day, but are rarely as remembered as they should be in jazz’s popular history.

Lovie Austin, Pianist (1887-1972)
Lovie Austin composed for and accompanied some of the greatest singers of the early recording era, including Ma Rainey and Ethel Waters. A number of her songs became hits, including “Down Hearted Blues,” a smash for Bessie Smith that sold close to 800,000 copies. Based in Chicago, Austin was also a frequent bandleader at some of the Harlem Renaissance’s most famous venues. Mary Lou Williams counted Austin as her largest inspiration. “My entire concept was based on the few times I was around Lovie Austin,” she later said.

Lil Hardin Armstrong, Pianist (1898-1971)
Lil Hardin met her future husband Louis Armstrong in 1922, when he joined her as a member of King Oliver’s famed Creole Jazz Band. Hardin, who studied at Fisk University and had an entrepreneurial streak, helped bring Armstrong forward as a bandleader, serving as his first manager, pianist and frequent co-composer. After they split up around 1930, she found some success with her own big band, but stepped away from performing years later after determining that male promoters would never be willing to promote her on the same level as men.
 
Valaida Snow, Trumpeter (1904-1956)
Valaida Snow’s career was a wildfire: a thing of great expanse and then rapid, wrenching exhaustion. She was a master of the trumpet but played a dozen other instruments, as well as singing, doing arrangements for orchestras, dancing, and appearing prominently in early Hollywood films. When the pioneering blues musician and composer W.C. Handy heard her play, he dubbed her “Queen of the Trumpet.” Denied a proper spotlight in Chicago and New York, Snow became a star abroad, touring for years in East Asia and Europe. She wound up stuck in Denmark during World War II, becoming ill while imprisoned there. She escaped in 1942 and spent the rest of her career back in the United States, although her health never recovered.

Peggy Gilbert, Saxophonist (1905-2007)
As a grade-school student in Sioux City, Iowa, Peggy Gilbert quickly became accustomed to cutting against the grain. The daughter of classical musicians, she was told in high school that the saxophone was unsuitable for a young woman — but she taught herself anyway. A year after graduating she started her first band, the Melody Girls. In 1938, outraged at an article in DownBeat magazine headlined “Why Women Musicians Are Inferior,” she penned a retort that the magazine published in full. “A woman has to be a thousand times more talented, has to have a thousand times more initiative even to be recognized as the peer of the least successful man,” she wrote. Talent and initiative were two things Gilbert possessed. She went on to lead ensembles for decades, on the vaudeville circuit and the Los Angeles scene, eventually becoming an official with the musicians’ union there. She continued to perform well into her 90s, and died at 102.

Una Mae Carlisle, Pianist (1915-1956)
Just like better-remembered contemporaries such as Fats Waller and Louis Jordan, Una Mae Carlisle made jazz that was also R&B and also pop — before the Billboard charts had effectively codified those genres. She was publicly known best as a singer, but she played virtuosic stride piano and composed prolifically too. Part black and part Native American, Carlisle was a pioneer in various ways, as Ms. Grantham pointed out. Carlisle was the first black woman to be credited as the composer of a song on the Billboard charts, and the first African-American to host her own regular, nationally broadcast radio show. She wrote for stars like Benny Goodman and Peggy Lee, and recorded her own hit singles, often with famous jazz musicians as her accompanists, before illness tragically shortened her career.

Ginger Smock, Violinist (1920-1995)
Orphaned at age 6 and subsequently raised by her aunt and uncle, Ginger Smock showed extravagant talents early on. At 10, she performed at the Hollywood Bowl; a year later, she gave a solo recital at the First African Methodist Episcopal Church of Los Angeles. She was the only black member of the Los Angeles Junior Philharmonic’s all-student symphony, and soon after she apprenticed with the jazz pioneer Stuff Smith. She then started an all-female trio, the Sepia Tones, that was a centerpiece of the city’s burgeoning Central Avenue jazz scene, and she soon became “pretty influential on the West Coast,” Ms. Grantham said. Later, Smock hosted a full-length (though short-lived) show on Los Angeles’s CBS affiliate, KTSL, in 1951, making hers the first black band to host a regular TV program.

Dorothy Donegan, Pianist (1922-1998)
A blazing player whose personality was as big and effusive as her talents, Dorothy Donegan piled her mastery of classical, stride, boogie-woogie and modern jazz piano into boisterous, often ribald performances. An old-school performer at heart, she could amaze and amuse an audience in equal measure. Donegan’s career was book ended by illustrious performances: In 1943, with dreams of becoming a professional classical pianist, she became the first black instrumentalist to give a concert at Orchestra Hall in Chicago. Time magazine covered it, and it set her on a path to renown, although a career in classical music was off-limits because of both her gender and her race. Fifty years later, she performed at the White House for President Bill Clinton. For all her accomplishments, Donegan made it clear in interviews that she felt sexism had prevented her from joining her male contemporaries in the music’s pantheon.

Jutta Hipp, Pianist (1925-2003)
Hailing from Leipzig, Germany, Jutta Hipp taught herself jazz as a child growing up in the Third Reich, secretly listening to international radio broadcasts. She was forced to flee her hometown at age 21, after the war left it in ruin; she supported herself by becoming a professional jazz pianist. Hipp eventually became the first woman bandleader to record for Blue Note Records, whose proprietors were German expatriates. But with true stardom escaping her, she eventually abandoned her career although she never totally gave up playing.

Clora Bryant, Trumpeter (1927-2019)
A self-proclaimed “trumpetiste,” Clora Bryant was part of the first generation of bebop musicians innovating in Los Angeles clubs, and she joined a handful of all-female ensembles in the years during and after World War II. Bryant became a featured soloist in the International Sweethearts of Rhythm, the most famous ensemble of its kind, then joined the Queens of Rhythm. Through the esteemed trombonist Melba Liston she met Dizzy Gillespie, who became her mentor. And as her career went on, she mentored countless musicians herself as a respected elder on the L.A. scene.

Bertha Hope Booker, Pianist (1936-)
Bertha Hope’s career bloomed alongside that of her husband Elmo Hope, whose economic hard-bop style was not altogether different from hers. They released a joint album together in 1961, but after his untimely death she focused on raising their children, performing intermittently around the New York area and remaining close with many musicians on the scene. Years later, she remarried, to the bassist Walter Booker; since then she has recorded a handful of albums and become a respected elder among younger New York musicians, including the bassist Mimi Jones, who recently made a documentary about her mentor titled “Seeking Hope.”
 
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/22/arts/music/women-jazz-musicians.html
http://mauricelynchmusic.com/
#MauriceLynchMusic
#JazzAppreciationMonth
 
Thu - April 23, 2020 7:20 pm     A+ | a-
 L to R Jackie Onasis,Clavin Klein,Bill C,Liza Minnelli,Andy Warhol, Pat Cleveland and Halston
L to R Jackie Onasis,Clavin Klein,Bill C,Liza Minnelli,Andy Warhol, Pat Cleveland and Halston
Maurice Lynch Music: Make sure you see this great film by Fimmaker Mark Bozek. My song "Tonight Josephine" sang my Legendary Super model Pat Cleveland is featured in the film. Bill Cunningham was no doubt one of the most celebrated society and fahion photographers of his day.  I wanted to share some photographs taken by Bill Cunningham of L to R Jacqueline Kennedy Onasis, Clavin Klein, Liza Minnelli, Andy Wharhol, Pat Cleveland and Halston.

Narrated by Sarah Jessica Parker, The Times of Bill Cunningham features incredible photographs chosen from over 3 million previously unpublicized images and documents from iconic street photographer and fashion historian Bill Cunningham. Told in Cunningham’s own words from a recently unearthed 1994 interview, the photographer chronicles, in his customarily cheerful and plainspoken manner, moonlighting as a milliner in France during the Korean War, his unique relationship with First Lady Jackie Kennedy, his four decades at The New York Times and his democratic view of fashion and society.
 

It’s been almost 4 years since the death of Bill Cunningham, the legendary chronicler of New York street fashion who worked for The New York Times for four decades. Cunningham’s contagious enthusiasm for fashion embraced both runway couture and how real people dress every day to live their lives. According to Cunningham, “The best fashion show is definitely on the street. Always has been. Always will be.”

You may remember those words from the terrific 2010 documentary Bill Cunningham New York (currently available to stream, and worth it). Watching it, or watching the Cunningham-narrated “On the Street” videos The Times published for years, you just want to hear more from Bill Cunningham. (If you feel like getting emotional, watch his segment on the “glorious sight” of spring in New York from April 2015, the last video in the series, as far as I can tell.)

Thankfully, a new documentary focuses on just that: hearing more from Bill Cunningham. Where the 2010 film told its story in part by following Cunningham through the weekly process of filing his photo features, The Times of Bill Cunningham is based on a 1994 interview taped by the film’s producer, Mark Bozek. Bozek cut the interview with hundreds of photos from Cunningham’s archive (and other archival photos and footage) and a narrative voiceover (by Sarah Jessica Parker). Apparently, the original plan was for a short conversation but the two talked for hours.

 
REACTIONS
“A snapshot of a life that leaves you grateful for having encountered it.”
Owen Gleiberman, Variety
“The real strength of Bozek’s film is how much of Cunningham’s own voice it gives us.”
David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter
AWARDS & FESTIVALS
NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL - OFFICIAL SELECTION 2018
ASPEN FILMFEST - 2019 AUDIENCE AWARD WINNER
BERKSHIRE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL - OFFICIAL SELECTION 2018


https://putthison.com/a-new-documentary-on-bill-cunningham/
http://greenwichentertainment.com/film/the-times-of-bill-cunningham/
http://mauricelynchmusic.com/

#PatCleveland
#MarkBozek
#TonightJosephine
#MauriceLynchMusic
#BillCunningham
#TheTimesofBillCunningham


 
Mon - March 9, 2020 5:39 pm     A+ | a-
 Movie Release for “The Times of Bill Cunningham” at the Angelika Theater in New York City
Movie Release for “The Times of Bill Cunningham” at the Angelika Theater in New York City
Hi Fashion & Music World, 

What a great magical night Thursday, February 13, 2020 and even greater to have my song “Tonight Josephine” sang by Legendary Super-Model Pat Cleveland be a part of this film. I must say that Pat Cleveland looked absolutely beautiful and I know Bill Cunningham was smiling down on this great evening. If you are in New York City they have an incredible tribute to Bill Cunningham at Nordstrom's and “Tonight Josephine” is a part of the music. 

The private screening hosted by M•A•C and Nordstrom of “The Times of Bill Cunningham” at the Angelika Theater in New York City. The movie was officially being released by Greenwood Entertainment at certain theaters on Feb 14, 2020.M•A•C and Nordstrom, with the Cinema Society and the CFDA, hosted the special screening of The Times of Bill Cunningham, a documentary about the famed street style photographer’s life. Guests included director Mark Bozek and Bill Cunningham’s niece, Trish Simonson. Also in attendance were Steven Kolb, Carol Alt, Pat Cleveland, Ruben Toledo, Andrew Saffir, Suzanne Bartsch, Jordan Roth, Theodora Richards, Tony Danza, Carole Radziwill, Frederique Van Der Wal, Fern Mallis, Tonne Goodman, Chloe Gosselin, Batsheva Hay, and Aurora James, Valerie Simpson, B. Michael, Lloyd Banks, Bethann Hardison, Andre Leon Talley, Carol Deitz. Music Producers- Azima & Maurice Lynch........ An after-party was also thrown at Bistrot Leo.

Drew Elliott, M•A•C Cosmetics global creative director, said: “M•A•C Cosmetics is honored to celebrate Bill Cunningham who is such a legend. He’s an important person who understood diversity and through his lens cared about who was bringing style no matter who you were or what your background was. He is a true icon with an amazing legacy.”

Maurice Lynch
Producer

http://greenwichentertainment.com/film/the-times-of-bill-cunningham/
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/13/movies/the-times-of-bill-cunningham-review.html
https://www.vogue.com/article/ruben-toledo-on-the-fashion-documentary-the-times-of-bill-cunningham
https://www.vogue.com/slideshow/the-times-of-bill-cunningham-new-york-screening
https://www.zimbio.com/photos/Maurice+Lynch/Times+Bill+Cunningham+New+York+Screening/eoiV-_EWjZI
https://www.zimbio.com/photos/Mark+Bozek/Times+Bill+Cunningham+New+York+Screening/eoiV-_EWjZI
https://time.com/5784414/the-times-of-bill-cunningham-review/
https://fashionweekdaily.com/bill-cunningham-documentary-mark-bozek/
https://www.gettyimages.com/photos/patrick-cunningham?family=editorial&phrase=patrick%20cunningham&sort=best
https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/maurice-lynch-and-director-mark-bozek-attend-a-new-york-news-photo/1206505674
http://mauricelynchmusic.com/tonightjosephine-patcleveland/
https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/patcleveland
https://music.apple.com/us/album/tonight-josephine/1122370887?i=1122371081
http://mauricelynchmusic.com/ 

 #TonightJosephine
#PatCleveland
#MauriceLynch
#MauriceLynchMusic
#TheTimesofBillCunningham

 
 
Wed - February 5, 2020 8:44 am     A+ | a-
Maurice Lynch Music: “The Times of Bill Cunningham” Opens February 14th 2020 at The Angelika Theater
Maurice Lynch Music: “The Times of Bill Cunningham” Opens February 14th 2020 at The Angelika Theater
Hi Music & Fashion World,
 
“The Times of Bill Cunningham” by Filmmaker Mark Bozek will beginning playing on February 14th 2020 at The Angelika Theater at 18 W Houston St, in New York City. The first two shows will have American fashion journalist and former American editor-at-large of Vogue magazine - Andre Leon Tally and Veteran American Fashion Model Bethann Hardison following the exhibit with Q&A.  Check the Angelika’s website for all times and showings.
 
It was so exciting for me to have my song “Tonight Josephine” sang by legendary super-model Pat Cleveland in this documentry. This film opened an incredible door for my music and for the song. Being able to have my music be a part of the award winning Journey of Bill Cunningham, and have it presented in museums, art exhibits, world-wide film festivals and at Newport’s Historic Rosecliff has been overwhelming and humbling.
 
The Film: The Time of Bill Cunningham - Told in Bill Cunningham’s own words from a recently unearthed six-hour 1994 interview, the iconic street photographer and fashion historian chronicles, in his customarily cheerful and plainspoken manner, moonlighting as a milliner in France during the Korean War, his unique relationship with First Lady Jackie Kennedy, his four decades at The New York Times and his democratic view of fashion and society. Narrated by Sarah Jessica Parker, The Times of Bill Cunningham features incredible photographs chosen from over 3 million previous.
 
The Theater: "The original Angelika Film Center & Café opened in New York City's Soho district in 1989. The Angelika plays an impressive and diverse mix of independent films, and is the definitive cinema of choice for filmmakers and film lovers alike. Since its opening, the Angelika New York has become the most successful and recognized arthouse in the United States. The Angelika offers a dynamic and sophisticated atmosphere. The theater is a great place to meet your friends or hang out by yourself, and patrons who come early can enjoy a gourmet snack at the café or browse our InFocus newsletter."
  
https://www.angelikafilmcenter.com/nyc/showtimes-and-tickets/coming-soon
https://www.angelikafilmcenter.com/nyc/film/the-times-of-bill-cunningham
https://indiefilming.com/films/the-times-of-bill-cunningham
http://mauricelynchmusic.com/
#thetimesofbillcunningham
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#patcleveland
#tonightjosephine
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